5 Easy Steps to Quit Single Use Plastic

5 Easy Steps to Quit Single Use Plastic

5 easy steps to quit single-use plastic

Sarah Tait, author of Wander Lightly shares her super simple tips

Easy steps to quit Single use Plastic

Here are some super simple tips that will help you reduce your use of single use plastic without too much effort.

  1. Skip the lid on your takeaway coffee cup – better yet invest in a reusable one 
  2. Say NO to straws
  3. Take your own reusable bag for shopping
  4. Invest in a reusable stainless steel/glass water bottle
  5. Take your own containers for the deli/butcher/takeaways

How you can further reduce your Plastic Use

Some simple things that won’t cost the earth & that you can start today to “Reduce your use”.

Invest in

  • A Stainless water bottle
  • Reusable glass coffee cup
  • Reusable Produce bags
  • Reusable Shopping bags
  • A Cutlery pouch for food on the go
  • A Stainless lunch box
  • Glass food storage containers
  • Keep a kit in your car with some of these items so you are prepared

Purchase

  • Food from bulk stores
  • Liquid goods like shampoo, cleaning products & olive oil from Bulk food stores
  • Loose Produce from the supermarket or farmers markets
  • Items in glass or cardboard
  • Use bar soap over liquid soaps
  • Goods second hand or better yet fix old ones, swap or barter
  • Local goods

Save

  • All of your used glass jars; they make excellent storage & freezing containers
  • Paper bags
  • Anything that can be reused or repurposed

Stop

  • Using Plastic straws
  • Using plastic bags in stores & from supermarkets
  • Purchasing anything wrapped in single use plastic especially takeaway food items
  • Purchasing liquids in Tetra paks, recycling is expensive & not particularly accessible
  • Purchasing bottled water & soft drinks in plastic
  • Using Balloons, they end up in turtles tummies
  • Using Glad wrap – use containers or invest in Beeswax reusable food wraps
  • Putting plastic lids on your takeaway coffee or tea if you don’t have a reusable cup
  • Using Styrofoam cups/takeaway containers; take your own

Start

  • Shopping at your local markets
  • Take your own containers to delis or butchers
  • Composting, Bokashi or a worm farm
  • Growing your own herbs or veggies
  • Making your own food & snacks
  • Sharing & swapping tips with others
  • Check out your local, Sell buy swap, Gumtree or barter pages for treasures
  • Taking responsibility for your local area, have a beach walk to pick up some trash.
  • We as consumers have the power to change how plastic is used & distributed.

Product sites

Check out the below sites that have some great Plastic free items to get you started & remember, take it slowly, you want this to be a lifestyle change rather than a passing phase.  Do things in bite sized chunks.  If things are challenging or take lots of time the changes won’t last.  Do things as you feel ready for the change.

Food Items

Markets: Local farmers market guide in Sydney

Bulk Food stores: The Source Bulk foods – Various locations across Australia

House Hold goodies & treats

Hopefully these easy tips inspire you to make changes, however small you think they are…every little bits counts!

Lover of Yoga, nourishing food, photography, the ocean & all her creatures & living Plastic Free.

Sarah Tait

Plastic Free Living Guru, Wander Lightly

Going out on a limb

What do marine plastic pollution, Frank Green cups, prosthetic limbs and trees have in common?

5forRyde

Simple Steps to Waste Less

We're all about positivity and achievable actions. We know the stats are dire and have plenty of info on hand for those who want to know more... but let's just concentrate on leading by example with simple steps we can all do to help make a sustainable future.

© 2018 5forRyde

 

STAY IN TOUCH

But aren’t they made of paper?

But aren’t they made of paper?

But aren't they recyclable?

Why takeaway coffee cups won't break down.

Whilst researching the “why” aren’t coffee cups recyclable, we came across this fun little website and thought you’d like it too.

Whilst disposable cups are marketed as ‘paper‘, they are commonly lined with polyethylene and have polystyrene lids (up to 5% plastic). In fact, 20 ‘paper cups‘ contain as much plastic as a small KeepCup.

Using disposable cups every day for a year will consume nearly a kilo of plastic. Even though KeepCup is made from plastic, KeepCup is about less plastic.

Check out the rest of the amazing facts and figures.

http://vs.keepcup.com.au

 

5forRyde

Simple Steps to Waste Less

We're all about positivity and achievable actions. We know the stats are dire and have plenty of info on hand for those who want to know more... but let's just concentrate on leading by example with simple steps we can all do to help make a sustainable future.

© 2018 5forRyde

 

STAY IN TOUCH

Forget the wallet

Forget the wallet

Forget the wallet

Frank Green is changing the way we pay for coffee

Technology is already changing how we pay, and Australia is one of the leading countries when it comes to modern payment technologies, accepting tap-n-go with ease, but a new coffee cup goes further.

In fact, it goes so far that the next time you order a cup of coffee, you might be able to pay with the cup itself.

That’s the idea behind the Frank Green SmartCup, a reusable cup made for you to take to your local coffee shop that actually has a gadgety angle (because we won’t cover it unless there’s a bit of technology inside that has changed or has the potential to change dramatically).

Inside the SmartCup, Frank Green has built in a small chip which can talk to the CafePay payment system, simply allowing you to pay with the cup you’ll be having your coffee poured into.

In fact, the technology is in the lid, with a tap from that lid to a sensor allowing the payment process to happen.

The concept of a smart coffee cup is the brainchild of an Australian who was looking for ways to reuse coffee cups and stop people from needing their wallet, finding what he saw was a middle ground.

“I saw the detrimental impact of single-use products, particularly coffee cups and water bottles, and thought ‘how can I resolve this problem?’”, said Benjamin Young, creator of the SmartCup by frank green.

“With payment technology emerging and consumers seeking easier ways to go about their day-to-day business, I saw a gap in the market. It’s a win-win for people and the environment.”

frankgreen-smartcup-2015-announce-01

The SmartCup is available in two sizes — 8oz (230mL) and 12oz (340mL) — with several colour variations made from recyclable materials that manage to be stain and odour free, with the chip inside connecting to the CafePay system and then to a credit card for easy payment.

If you do forget your SmartCup, you’ll find CafePay accepts payment from a smartphone as well, so the one time you do forget your SmartCup, you’ll just have to go with a paper cup instead.

“What we’re creating is the ability to go cash-free,” said Young, adding that “you can easily load credit onto your account.”

“It’s for friends to send one another a coffee ‘just because’. For people to build loyalty with their local café and be rewarded for going back. For the ease with which cafes can notify customers of special offers and discounts via the CafePay app, all whilst being sustainable and environmentally friendly.”

Pricing for the SmartCup comes in at a starting price of $32.95 in Australia, though the places you can use it with the cup-payment functionality are pretty slim at the moment, offering up seven cafes in Melbourne, two in Adelaide, one in Ballarat, and one in Sydney. We’re told this will be growing, though, so if you have a cafe you frequent, it might be worth telling them about it.

Frank likes long walks on the beach. Preferably the kind of walks that don’t involve picking up a gazillion coffee cups. That’s the dream.

Ben Young

Founder, Frank Green

Going out on a limb

What do marine plastic pollution, Frank Green cups, prosthetic limbs and trees have in common?

5forRyde

Simple Steps to Waste Less

We're all about positivity and achievable actions. We know the stats are dire and have plenty of info on hand for those who want to know more... but let's just concentrate on leading by example with simple steps we can all do to help make a sustainable future.

© 2018 5forRyde

 

STAY IN TOUCH